Archive for the News Category

Charpentier’s Messe de Minuit

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , on December 6, 2010 by Craig Zeichner

Charpentier’s Messe de Minuit was the first piece of French baroque music that I ever encountered. Sir David Willcocks’ with the Kings College Choir, Cambridge and the English Chamber Orchestra on Angel was the first recording of the piece that I owned and many years later it remains a favorite.

Charpentier’s use of traditional French noëls gives the work its unique charm. Here’s a terrific post about the piece on this from the Magnificat blog, hopefully we will get a Magnificat recording of it some day.

A Charpentier Discovery

Posted in News with tags , on November 9, 2010 by Craig Zeichner

Marc-Antoine Charpentier

Patricia Ranum has discovered a new Marc-Antoine Charpentier manuscript. Read about it

Antonio Florio’s Cappella della Pietà de’ Turchini on Glossa

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on September 2, 2010 by Craig Zeichner

Rave all you want about Harmonia Mundi, I think the best early music label is Glossa. They have fantastic artists, interesting repertoire, superior engineering and gorgeous packaging. The artist roster is about to get better with the addition of the superb Naples-based Cappella della Pietà de’ Turchini. Their recordings of obscure Neapolitan baroque music were mainstays of the Naive label, but Naive stepped away from the Neapolitan project and decided to shift their energies to recording every note that Vivaldi wrote. That’s not a bad thing but I sure missed those Cappella della Pietà de’ Turchini recordings. Here’s the news.

To learn more about the Cappella della Pietà de’ Turchini, visit them at their website.

Here’s the ensemble in an excerpt from Cristoforo Caresana’s marvelous Christmas cantata

4 X 4 Baroque Music Festival

Posted in News with tags on August 26, 2010 by Craig Zeichner

I’m sorry I missed tonight’s Bach and Before concert, but there are still some tasty things to come. What a great opportunity to hear A-list performers in terrific repertoire. Check out the artist roster.

Tomorrow night’s Across the Alps: Handel in Italy has music by Muffat (I so love saying “Muffat”) Bach and Handel (his terrific Dixit Dominus). Saturday night’s Three, Songs from Venice and Rome is right in my groove zone with music by the underrated but relentlessly brilliant Giovanni Felice Sances and Barbara Strozzi (and others) and Monday has concertos from the blessed Antonio Vivaldi’s L’estro armonico – listen closely and you will realize that Stravinsky had his head up his…sleeve when he said Vivaldi wrote the same concerto 400 times. All this great music and what does it cost you? Nothing! These are free concerts. Miss them at your own peril.

Georg Muffat, have you heard the muffat man?

For more information visit the 4 X 4 Baroque Music Festival

New York Polyphony at Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue

Posted in News with tags , , , , , on August 11, 2010 by Craig Zeichner

I am happy to see that New York Polyphony will be singing this Sunday’s service music at Saint Thomas Church Fifth Avenue. They will be singing:

13th Century English Mass, from the Worcester Fragments (c. 1300)

Andrew Smith (b. 1970): Flors regalis

Beata viscera, from the Worcester Fragments

There will also be organ music by Buxtehude, Dupré and Langlais.

For more information, visit the Saint Thomas Church

A new friend

Posted in News with tags , on August 5, 2010 by Craig Zeichner

One of the great things about having my early music blog is feedback from readers. Here’s a video sent to me by the Swedish lutenist and guitarist Jonas Nordberg. He’s playing Robert de Visée’s Prélude et Allemande from the Suite in a minor. Mr. Nordberg told me that he is working on a recording of music by Visée. The label and release date are yet to be decided, but based on this video it’s certainly worth waiting for!

Early Music at the Miller Theatre

Posted in News with tags , , , , , , , , on June 16, 2010 by Craig Zeichner


The  upcoming season at the Miller Theatre at Columbia University has some choice  early music concerts. I can’t wait to hear Stile Antico, New York Polyphony,  Sequentia and Le Poème Harmonique. The Bach and the Baroque series looks pretty  hot too – TENET is a group that more audiences need to know and they have selected some fantastic repertoire.

Here are the details from the Miller Theatre press release:

Early Music

IN PARADISUM
October 16
An ensemble of a dozen unaccompanied singers, most still in their twenties and three who are sisters, Stile Antico is revitalizing Renaissance choral music. The group performs without a conductor, approaching choral works with the dynamic cohesion of a string quartet. This program focuses on the musical responses of composers faced with their own mortality, featuring swansongs and memorials by such masters as Lassus, Dufay, des Prez, and Byrd.

Stile Antico

GIANTS OF THE FLEMISH RENAISSANCE
November 20
New York Polyphony, rising stars on the early music scene, has been likened to Anonymous 4 for their impeccable ensemble and wide-ranging programming. They perform Flemish and Tudor music for men’s voices, bringing a unique richness to selections by Ockeghem, Brumel, Dunstable, and Taverner, including excerpts from their new album, Tudor City.

New York Polyphony

SONGS FROM THE ISLAND SANCTUARY
January 22
In the 12th century, the Cathedral of Notre Dame in Paris was far more than a tourist mecca. It was an entire city unto itself, with a private port on the Seine and its own schools, laws, and social life. In this passionately performed, meticulously researched program, Benjamin Bagby and his acclaimed medieval ensemble Sequentia bring that bygone era to life, suffusing centuries-old music with striking immediacy.

Sequentia

ESPERAR, SENTIR, MORIR
February 19
Court composers in 17th century Spain and Italy often borrowed amply from street dances and folk songs, inspired by the rhythms, melodies, and improvisatory freedom of popular music. The ever-enticing Le Poème Harmonique returns to take us on a tour of this spirited music—complete with guitar and castanets. The program will feature the group’s soprano Claire Lefilliâtre, who garnered special mention after their performance last season: “Le Poème Harmonique’s five singers produced beautifully balanced sound, but the clear standout was Claire Lefilliâtre, who brought a virtuosic flair to the soaring, ambitiously ornamented soprano line.” (The New York Times)

Le Poème Harmonique

CELEBRATING THE GENIUS OF VICTORIA
April 2
The intensely spiritual, passionate music of Spanish composer Tomás Luis de Victoria has moved generations of listeners. The Tallis Scholars return to the series with a program celebrating the 400th anniversary of Victoria’s death, focusing on his grandest choral works, including the composer’s crowning achievement: the monumental Requiem.

The Tallis Scholars

Bach and the Baroque

SEEING DOUBLE: CONCERTO BY BACH AND VIVALDI
March 26
One of the most respected period instrument ensembles in the world, REBEL has been praised by The Boston Globe as “vital…dashing…with performances that lacked nothing in inwardness, charm, or brilliance.” Antonio Vivaldi’s concerti for two solo instruments inspired some of Bach’s most brilliant music. Rebel explores the fascinating connection between the two composers in a program of double concerti for strings and harpsichords.

Rebel

RECLAIMING BACH FOR THE RECORDER
April 28
The delightful and entertaining Flanders Recorder Quartet has set out to right what they consider Bach’s sole shortcoming: his small output for recorder. The ensemble, whose delicate sound has been likened to Baroque organ, arranges works for keyboard and other instruments in this program, featuring Bach’s lively Italianate concerti, inventive preludes and fugues, beautifully expressive chorales, and monumental passacaglie.

Flanders Recorder Quartet

BACH AND HIS PREDECESSORS
May 14
Church of St. Mary the Virgin (145 W. 46th St.)
Bach revolutionized German music, but like all great composers, he had his forbearers, such as Heinrich Schütz and Dieterich Buxtehude. The “sensational” new ensemble TENET joins forces with Spiritus Collective to perform festive German Baroque works for voice, strings, and brass, culminating in Bach’s brilliant early motet Jesu, meine Freude.

TENET

Complete details are at the Miller Theatre website

Here’s New York Polyphony singing Christopher Tye’s In Pace